Review – Chicken Picks Bermuda 2.1mm

Holland. To many, the spiritual home of drugs and legal prostitution, but as I can assert, it’s one of the cleanest, most relaxed places I’ve ever been, and has some of the best food I’ve ever eaten. I’d also add that those vendors who sell chips with peanut sauce are essentially royalty, and that coming back to the UK after that was a bit of a disappointment.

But I’m not here to slate the UK’s chippies. Today we’re talking about Chicken Picks, more specifically the Bermuda III 2.1mm. Many moons ago when I was at Wunjo Guitars, we got a tester bag of these in, and I loved them. I took a couple home and played with them for a week or so to see how I felt, but I was so into Gravity at the time that I didn’t give them a fair crack. Starting this blog put my assessment hat back on though, and I’ve revisited Eppo Franken’s creations quite a bit since then, swelling my collection to include the Shredder, Regular and Badazz III, but the Bermuda is the dude.

Made from matt-finished Thermoset and finished by hand, the Bermuda III is a triangular pick with two different points – two sharp(ish) and one blunted. It’s important to stress that these produce distinctly different versions of the same sound, with the more pronounced edges having a higher treble content. The bevels are smoothly cut, with excellent finishing – Eppo’s been knocking these out since ’84, and it shows.

Compared to other thermoset picks I’ve got – both matt and polished – the Bermuda is categorically brighter, but without losing anything in the bass. My thicker Chicken Picks, like the aforementioned Shredder, have greater body still, with more power and greater definition, but it’s the size and shape of our test pick that stands out. There’s very little string noise if any (as is the way with matt-finish thermoset), and that alone is worth the extremely reasonable asking price. Interestingly, I bought Monster Grips with my last order (there’s a separate test of those coming, don’t you worry), and as I’ve got two Bermuda 2.1’s I fitted one with the Grips and left one natural, and the natural one has better top end. See kids – your resonant materials do make a difference!

There’s little effort required in generating big tones from these picks, but the grip is still a thing for me. I tend not to grip my picks all that hard as a result of a) sticking to acrylic like proper glue and b) having a relaxed style in my old age, and as a result the ultra-smooth surface of this particular thermoset makes me a bit twitchy. That being said, when I don’t think about it and just play the guitar, the picks do all the work for me. It’s worth noting that friends of mine whos fingers don’t stick to acrylic found these picks to grip extremely well, and I know at least one player (Krimson from Furnaze) who won’t use any picks other than these.

I keep coming back to the Bermuda for electric work because it’s so clean and effortless, and even though I struggle with the grip sometimes I’d still recommend that you give Chicken Picks a try – there’s something in their concise range for every player, and they’re very generous with both their cable ties and stickers. Leuk!

Vitals:

  • 2.1mm thick
  • Matt-finish thermoset
  • Made in Blegium and Germany, hand-finished in the Netherlands
  • A clean and clear 8.5/10
  • Cost Per Unit: a 2-pack will cost you $14.95, and the shipping is free to the UK
  • Adaptable, clean and clear as a cold spring morning

https://www.chickenpicks.com/shop/2x-bermuda-iii-2-1-mm/

Facebook/Instagram: @chickenpicks

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